225 West 17th Street

225 West 17th Street

Located in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, this 1912 manufacturing building was converted into a luxury condominium residential tower. The original 38,710 square foot, six-story structure now offers thirteen residential units and ground floor commercial space across 10 floors and a full-floor cellar. Using innovative massing and materiality, Rogers Partners created a new, transformed building with a distinctive identity.

Multifamily, Residential, 
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221 West 17th Street Architecture

To reposition the property as a residential development, the floor area of the original six-story structure was strategically reconfigured to maximize the opportunities of the site. The rear of the lot was opened up to provide light and air for the lower floors, and four new floors were added above the existing roof to create penthouse levels that capitalize on the striking southern view over the Greenwich Village Landmark District.

The existing cast iron and wood structure was reinforced, and a new stair and elevator core were added to support the new roof addition. The design carefully utilizes the 50-foot building width to create spacious and flexible apartment layouts. Enlarged window openings on the lower levels, together with expansive floor-to-ceiling glass on the penthouse levels, maximize sunlight and views. Each unit has at least one terrace or balcony.

The new south-facing façade transforms the original, non-descript brick building, while upgrading the exterior wall to meet contemporary thermal performance standards. The design utilizes a 2012 New York City Zoning provision to add exterior wall thickness beyond the property line in exchange for thermal insulation improvements. The new skin is a porcelain tile rainscreen with projecting bronze-finished aluminum window surrounds in a composition that changes with the light throughout the day. 

The building massing allocates the permitted Zoning area above the seventh-floor setback to form 15-foot deep cantilevered “dormer” boxes. The roofs of the projecting volumes provide additional exterior terrace areas for residents.  From the street, these volumes appear to float unsupported, creating dynamic spaces with dramatic corner views.